Sahabat Maya :

Saturday, May 5, 2012

English and ICT adoption



To keep up with global ICT changes, equitable access to the English language should be made available to all. And teachers should be encouraged to develop contents in English and vernacular languages that are relevant to local communities.
To keep up with global ICT changes, equitable access
to the English language should be made available to all.
And teachers should be encouraged to develop contents
in English and vernacular languages that are
relevant to local communities.







English and ICT adoption


DOES proficiency in English have a bearing on ICT adoption and Internet penetration, which then determines the innovative capacity and socio-economic status of communities? There seems to be some indication this holds true.






For example, research company Miniwatts Marketing Group found that 464 million Internet users worldwide from an estimated 1.6 billion use English on the Web as at the first quarter of this year. The next most popular language is Chinese, with some 320 million users.





Within the same period, North America, Oceania/ Australia and Europe have the world’s highest Internet penetration rate at 74.4 per cent, 60.4 per cent and 48.9 per cent respectively, with the world average at 23.8 per cent. Residents in these areas are mostly English speaking.





And majority of the countries in the said regions lead in ICT adoption and innovation.





For the Malaysian context, an industry review by the National ICT Association of Malaysia (Pikom) show that those who are bilingual, with one language being English, are more likely to be Internet users and use the computer more than those who talk and are educated mainly in their mother tongues.





Around the globe, it is acknowledged that English proficiency is an important prerequisite for joining in the information society. So, it is logical to assume, as Pikom puts it, that groups that are not proficient in English in Malaysia will not be able to keep up with global ICT changes. Simply put, economic and employment opportunities will be harder to come by for them.




The solution? Pikom is proposing equitable access to the English language should be made available to everyone. And teachers should be encouraged to develop contents in English and vernacular languages that are relevant to local communities.





Enterprises also should be encouraged to develop contents in local languages that match the needs of rural communities, for example.





It is important not to sweep aside the many studies and suggestions regarding English proficiency for ICT adoption and Internet penetration, no matter how vague the co-relation. To make sure that we are not losing out in the knowledge economy, we need all the help we can get.









No comments:

Post a Comment

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...